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Who Invented the Air Conditioning?

Air conditioning is one technology it is hard to imagine life without–who actually made it?

Hot weather is great when you are lounging by the pool, but it can be a lot less pleasant when you are melting inside on your couch. Though fans can provide some temporary relief, nothing works quite like the air conditioner. In today’s world, we have so many different models with different features–but have you ever thought to look back at where it all began? In this post, we’re looking into the invention of the air conditioner.

Inventing the Air Conditioner

Bringing cool air to the masses is the kind of offering that is guaranteed to bring you some degree of fame, but the original versions of the air conditioner weren’t quite what we know today. The history of the air conditioner is surprisingly complex. Let’s take a look at how it all began.

When Was the Air Conditioner First Made?

Even though most of us can’t imagine life without the air conditioner, it actually wasn’t introduced until the 1900s. Specifically, the first version of the air conditioner comparable to what we know today was created in 1902. Before that, fans were the only real relief from the heat available!

Who Created the First Air Conditioner?

The version of the air conditioner that was released in 1902 was created by a man named Willis Haviland Carrier. As you might expect, Carrier was a very talented engineer. Like any engineer, he was committed to solving a problem–and the problem actually wasn’t the masses melting in the sweltering heat. He was looking to cool down a business dedicated to printing. Yes, objects received this technology long before we did!

How Have Air Conditioners Changed?

Throughout history, air conditioners have changed time and time again–always for the better. Since their introduction, air conditioners have decreased in size and increased in efficiency. We can fit them into smaller places (including windows!), and they take a lot less energy to run. Even today’s systems that are not considered energy efficient are more efficient than older models.

Are There A Lot of Air Conditioner Manufacturers?

Given the popularity of air conditioners, we shouldn’t be surprised that a lot of big names have joined the market. There are tons of air conditioner manufacturers all around the world. Thanks to these talented groups, we have the cold air we know and love!

The Takeaway

Life without air conditioning is hot and humid. Even though Denver isn’t known for its humidity, it is known to bring the heat during those summer months–especially in the evenings. For all of your modern Denver air conditioning needs, we are happy to help. Our experts will help you to enjoy all of the benefits that modern air conditioning systems can offer and more!

How to Install an A/C Unit In an Apartment

Not all apartment buildings have central air conditioning, and those tenants that don’t have that luxury may have to go out and buy their own window unit. But before the tenant can enjoy the cool comfort the air conditioner provides, they have to get the A/C unit installed correctly first. There are a number of factors that go into getting air conditioner, so it’s vital to make an informed decision.

Before You Install an Air Conditioner

Because it’s not your property, the first step is to make sure that you have permission from the landlord or property owner to install the air conditioning unit first. The property owner might have rules or preferences about how or where you install the unit, as well. Depending on the landlord’s preferences, it’s good to find out which room is optimal for cooling the whole space.

There are a lot of options out there, so knowing how many square feet you need to cool can help determine the number of British Thermal Units (BTU) you need. Generally, every 400 square feet requires around 20 BTU to cool. Factors like vaulted ceilings, sunny spaces and multiple occupants can increase that number, as well. Also, before you go grabbing the biggest unit with the most BTU, make sure the unit you choose will fit where it’s getting installed.

Securely Installing Your Apartment A/C Unit

Once you know the size of your space, and the other particulars, it’s time to get it installed and running so you can relax in the comfort. When dealing with apartment heating and air conditioning in Denver, it is vital to make sure the A/C unit is installed correctly. A mishap may create a dangerous situation – depending on what floor you’re on – or could damage the window or frame it is mounted in. Remember, the more BTU, the heavier the unit will be.

You’ll need all of the proper tools, and the manual should provide a list of what you need. Once the unit is properly assembled, it’s important to be safe when getting it mounted in the window. Don’t just balance the A/C unit on the window sill, because the window sash is not designed to bear all of the weight of an air conditioner. If your unit doesn’t come with one, use a support bracket on the outside wall. Rest the unit on the bracket for help in securing it when you get it into place. Not placing it properly and getting it sealed in place with the sashes around the unit and window can meke it not work as efficiently, and can be dangerous.

Correctly installing an air conditioner in an apartment is more than just buying one and propping it in a window. Making sure it’s done safely and correctly is important for the tenant and landlord alike. For more information on how to install an A/C unit in an apartment, contact the experts at Go Green Heating and Air Conditioning today.

What is a good seer rating for an air conditioner?

Shopping for a new air conditioner can be overwhelming. These units not only have a wide array of specs to peruse, but choosing the wrong type can leave you either overspending or uncomfortable during those summer heatwaves.

One important number to keep in mind when shopping for a new Denver air conditioning unit is the SEER rating. Find out more about what a SEER rating is, why it’s important that you choose a good SEER rating, and where to find the best Denver heating and air assistance.

SEER Rating Explained

SEER is an acronym, though you may see two different phrases for it. Both Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio and Rating are correct when referencing SEER. The rating is important because it measures the cooling efficiency of an AC unit. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, air conditioning units are one of the highest energy spenders in your home. So, paying attention to the SEER number can help keep energy costs low – if you know what to look for.

You can calculate a SEER rating by dividing the total electric energy output by the cooling capacity ratio. If a unit has a high SEER rating, this indicates that it has higher energy efficiency. Each SEER rating can be ranked from most to least effective in terms of efficiency, as well. The average SEER ratings for any given air conditioning unit include:

  • Low-ranking: units with a 13 or 14 SEER are considered the least effective and energy efficient nationwide
  • Average: the most average SEER ratings are between 15 and 20
  • Above-average: units with SEER above 21 are considered the most energy efficient. Some high-efficiency AC units rank as high as 23

Finding the right SEER rating for your home

Having a unit with a high SEER rating doesn’t always mean that it will perform at maximum capacity, however. Like homes, air conditioning units are all different, and most are not designed with a one-size-fits-all approach. HVAC systems are constantly evolving, however, and new technology updates have shown improvements with energy-efficiency, consistency, and cost.

Before you look into air conditioning replacement, be sure to consider your home’s size, as well as your budget. Although a higher SEER rating may impact the upfront cost of your AC unit, it will eventually save you more on your utility bills.

Other energy-efficient tips

SEER isn’t the only determining factor for energy usage when it comes to air conditioning units. There are many other ways you can limit excess energy usage to cut down on utility bills. You can utilize a free, online energy-usage calculator provided by the U.S. Department of Energy. This not only helps calculate energy costs for your home, but will help you determine which units are the best in terms of SEER ratings per your location.

Regular maintenance and upkeep for your current HVAC unit can also help prevent it from using excess energy each month. Check with your local heating and air conditioning professional on how you can use less power or get a home energy audit.

When Was Central Air Conditioning Invented?

Central air conditioning was a life-changing invention that is popular to this day. Let’s explore its history.

When we think about air conditioning, most of us consider it to be an expected part of any building during those scorching summer months. Even though this incredible invention is a normal and common development in a lot of homes and buildings, the fact remains that we didn’t always have air conditioning. In fact, air conditioning’s introduction to our society might have come a lot later than you would expect. In this article, we will discuss the history of central air conditioning.

A Brief Look at the History of Air Conditioning

The first inspiration for air conditioning was actually a problem with a magazine producer in Brooklyn. Try as they might, this magazine could not keep its pages from wrinkling with humidity. Their desperate need for a way to remove humidity was the first step toward modern air conditioning as we know it, but the history isn’t all that simple.

When Was Air Conditioning Invented?

Centralized air conditioning was a major step in cooling systems, and it was the first version of today’s modern air conditioners. First iterations of this technology were mass-produced and marketed by famed cooling giant Frigidaire, which produced central cooling systems that were designed specifically for homes. Prior versions were too large, too expensive, and too difficult to manage. Frigidaire brought cooling into the home–and society has never been the same. Of course, even with their introduction, central air conditioning didn’t really pop off for homeowners until the 1960s.

How Has Air Conditioning Changed?

Older versions of cooling systems were nothing like the ones that we know today. This kind of technology has changed substantially throughout the years, going from systems designed to hang in windows to the modern renditions that we now know and love.

The most significant change has been in energy consumption and price. While older versions of air conditioners were large, expensive, and a huge drain on energy, modern versions are smaller, cheaper, and use more than 50% less energy than older models.

Do We Need Air Conditioning?

Given how long we went without air conditioning, you might wonder if we really need it. Though air conditioning can seem like a luxury comfort, it is important to remember that it really can be beneficial for more than just our comfort. Air conditioning can even save lives during heat waves.

The Takeaway

Since air conditioning is such an important part of the home, it is important to keep it running. If you are looking for Denver air conditioning repair, we are happy to help you keep your home nice and cool during those sweltering waves of Denver heat. When the temperature spikes, it is always nice to know that your air conditioning unit is up to the job. Feel free to contact us directly to learn how we can keep your home nice and cool year-round!

How does a central air conditioner work?

Found in many homes across the U.S., central air conditioning keeps residences comfortable during the hottest months of the year. For Colorado homeowners, this is an essential tool used to stay cool for many of the sunny days found in the local climate.

Learning about how central air conditioners work can help you stay ahead of any issues that might arise so that you can avoid costly repairs. Keep reading to discover more about central air conditioning units and where to find Denver air conditioner repair if your system shuts down.

About Central AC

Using a central air conditioning unit is one of the best ways to cool down an entire home. These quiet units are virtually unnoticeable, unlike bulky window units. Plus, they have enough power to cool multiple floors and rooms. This helps free up window space while keeping your home at a comfortable temperature all summer long. Your central air conditioning unit will become such a staple of your day-to-day life, you’ll probably forget it even exists.

Central AC units can also be programmed with all the new technology. These smart AC units can pair to a phone app or other smart device so you can control it remotely. This can help you save money on your energy bills, since you adjust the settings from room to room. Keep air from flowing into unused areas or turn the thermostat off when you’re not home.

How it functions

Every central air conditioning unit features two primary functions occurring simultaneously both inside and outside your home.

Located inside the home, the cold side of the system cools warm indoor air with a cooling device. This device is a cold coil filled with refrigerant that absorbs the warmth from the air. The refrigerant then transforms from a liquid into a gas during this process before pushing the cooled air back into the space.

At the same time, the external hot side of the system is compressing the refrigerant gas before pushing into another coil. Heat from the indoor air is released outside while the refrigerant transforms from a gas back to a liquid. In tandem, the fan of the AC unit sucks in outside air through the coil so that no heat from the house is absorbed into it.

This results in a cycle of humidity and heat leaving the home by being removed from the air inside while cool air is being created and pushed in.

Let’s take a look at the step-by-step process of how this system works:

  1. Located in a central location of your home, the thermostat monitors the indoor air temperature. This control pad includes sensors that signal to the unit when the air temperature is meeting the cooling threshold.
  2. Once the unit is signaled, the indoor unit fan starts to pull in hot air through the air ducts. Any airborne particles like dust, lint, or pet dander are collected in the air filters.
  3. The warm filtered air travels over the cooling cool and the refrigerant inside the coil turns from a liquid to a gas. The refrigerant then absorbs the heat from the air.
  4. The cool air is blown back into the home by the indoor blower fan.
  5. The refrigerant gas travels outside into the outdoor compressor unit where it is pressurized and sent to the outdoor condenser coil.
  6. Outdoor air is pulled into the condenser coil by the outdoor unit fan so that it can absorb the excess heat energy from the indoor air.
  7. While this is happening, the refrigerant turns back into liquid form and travels back inside where the cycle continues.

Contact Go Green Heating and Air Conditioning for Denver AC repair, maintenance, and installation.